Company

Galloping
white horses
riding the waves,
keeping our little yacht
company.

Sail or Sale

I have probably mentioned before that we have a sailing yacht. It is a Barbican 33 designed by the late Maurice Griffiths, a naval architect and long-term editor of Yachting Monthly magazine. Her name is Red Dawn IV, the previous owner having also owned Red Dawn’s I, II and III. It is considered unlucky to change the name so we kept it. She has been pictured on this blog before but here she is again:

Barbican 33 yacht

We have both been sailing for many years. I learned to sail in dinghies as a teenager and my husband spent some of his childhood holidays on board his uncle’s yacht. After we were married we lived on the Essex coast where we first owned a Tideway sailing dinghy and then, when the children came along, progressed to family sailing cruisers. There were a few years that we didn’t have a boat, when we had moved inland due to my husband’s job and while the children were growing up and into other things, but eventually the bug bit again.

We have owned several yachts since returning to boating and have owned Red Dawn IV for about 12 years now I think. We have always kept our boats on the East Coast, despite now living a fair distance away in the north-west midlands. We love the sailing there, it is less crowded (and cheaper) than the south coast and it is handy for crossing to Europe where we have enjoyed the French and Belgian coast and cruising the Dutch inland waterways.

Many people carry on sailing until they reach a ripe old age, but by then their sailing activities slow down and they struggle to keep up with the boat’s maintenance. Indeed, go to any marina and you will find a quite ‘graveyard’ corner where boats go to die, their owners no longer fit enough to sail and the boats in unsellable condition. The longer they lie there the more unlikely it is that they will be sold as they deteriorate even more. Anxious to avoid that fate for Red Dawn IV, a couple of years ago my husband decided it was time to sell the yacht while we were still fit and active, after all we are not getting any younger. Besides we had other interests we could move on to and we could satisfy our wanderlust with a motor home. We put the boat on the market.

The boat is in excellent condition and is maintained and equipped to a high specification, but it didn’t sell. In with plan B. This was to sail the boat through the French Canals to the Mediterranean, where we would leave it somewhere near where our daughter lives in Spain. We took the boat off the market, checked out some marinas and fully prepared the boat for this trip. However, due to various circumstances, not least the fact that we couldn’t find a marina that we felt offered what we were looking for bearing in mind how infrequently we would be able to visit, that plan went by the board.

We had given up our home marina berth and its annual fee in preparation for the trip so now we decided to put the boat on the market once more. To avoid the costly expense of having it put back in the water and pay a monthly, rather than annual fee, we left the boat high and dry on the hard. This time we really would sell it! With the boat out of the water we did not sail at all last year but enjoyed several trips away in our motor home instead, including a longer trip for about six weeks in the autumn taking in France and Spain and able to visit further afield than is possible when you are confined to waterways.

Again the boat didn’t sell and we are now on Plan C. We have taken the boat off the market once more and have decided to keep her a bit longer. We are returning to the idea of taking her into the French canals, but not through to the Med. Having spoken to friends who juggle their time between boat and motor home, often leap-frogging the two around together on the continent, it seems like a tempting solution. We now plan to return the boat to the water and cross over to France in the spring. We are no longer interested in heroic sea voyages  so we will cruise around the French and Belgian canals and perhaps into Holland, overwintering wherever we chose and then returning to do the same the following year. We will follow the boat around with the motor home and also use the motor home to visit other locations and to cross into Spain for visits there. At least that’s the plan.

Baking

Baking treats
to take to eat
when we meet
with friends for the day
while we’re away
on our yacht.

Red Dawn

Yacht Red Dawn IV

Red Dawn IV

You’ve heard so much about her so for my ‘Small Stone’ today I thought I would share this picture of our Yacht ‘Red Dawn IV’. She is a Barbican 33, so she is approximately 33 ft long (9.96 meters). You can just make us out in the cockpit!

We are still on board and will return home at the weekend. Unfortunately this means we will miss watching the Olympic Games opening ceremony on the TV this evening and will have to catch up later on ‘iplayer’!

Site content copyright of Elizabeth Leaper (Libby).

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