Witness

Today the sun smiles
as if yesterday’s wind and rain
had never been.
Only puddles and soggy leaves
bear witness.

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Vanished

A breeze breaks up the stillness,
the atmosphere is heavy and grey,
the late morning sun has vanished again
and rain is on the way.

Silvered

Silvered
by cloud
a feeble sun
tries to break through.
Defeated.

Complaints

Today the sun sulks
behind cloud cover,
tired of our complaints.
A brief respite from the heat,
but of the drought?
No end in sight.

Promised

Today started cool
and overcast
with promise of rain
in the forecast.
Possibly anywhere,
maybe not everywhere,
still some uncertainty.
Now the sun comes
and all hopes fast fade,
along with the shade.
Rain somewhere today,
but not here.

Draining

Hot,
the sun
on my skin,
draining all my energy.
Lethargic.

Golden

Golden buttercups,
shining like miniature suns;
bright spots in my lawn.

The Sun

The sun turns her face
behind grey clouds and weeps
to see the daffodils fade away.

White cherry blossom pom-poms
waving in the breeze call
her back to smile again.

Unexpected Day

Today, an unexpected day.
I thought it would be wet
but no, despite a cloudy sky,
the cold edge of Winter’s breath,
it’s dry and an unassuming sun
placidly holds sway.

Spring Englyn

Snowdrops now their dainty heads show, green stems
extend through cloak of snow.
Signs of Spring; we watch them grow.

Following soon come tulips fair, and bold
gold daffodils bloom where
now the ground is dark and bare.

The seasons are changing, the sun returns
and warms the earth, to shun
Winter’s grip; her battle won.

* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

Whilst looking for something else on the Internet I came across the Englyn form. This is, I understand, an old Bardic poetic form and I thought it would be fun to try to write one. As you can see the form consists of  3-line stanzas. It is a syllable counting form with lines of 10, 6 and 7 syllables respectively. That’s the easy bit!

The rhyme pattern requires end rhymes of AAA. However, (and this is where it gets complicated) the end rhyme of the first line isn’t actually at the end; it can be one, two or three syllables in from the end and the sound of the syllables after the rhyming word are echoed at the beginning of the following line.

You will see I have cheated a bit here, my echoes are not exact, making use of near rhymes and slant rhymes – green stems/extend (Stanza 1),  returns/and warms (stanza 3) and missing out one element in stanza 2 – and bold/gold.

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