‘Bertie’ Bike News

It’s a few weeks since I wrote about cycling so it’s about time for an update. I should say that I haven’t really had much of interest to write about lately on that front as we haven’t been out on any more trail rides for a while, but that doesn’t mean we haven’t been out and about on the bikes. Although the days are getting shorter and the weather cooler we have still been out for our normal road riding jollies of varying lengths and recently I have had cause to re-test my classic road-race bike ‘Bertie’.

I have written a few posts about Bertie in the past. You will find the most recent here, and if you follow this link you will also find links to earlier posts about the rest of Bertie’s story.

Although I have ridden ‘Bertie’ (now more usually referred to as ‘HB’) many times, including at the Eroica Britannia, I have always had a slight problem with the bike. More specifically with the gears. HB (Bertie) has the gear shifter on the down tube in the old style and there are only five gears. At least in theory there are five gears but in practice I have, more often than not, only had 4 or sometimes only 3 as No.5 and sometimes No.4 refuse to co-operate. Fortunately with at least four gears and given that it is the top not the bottom gear that has given most problem the bike has still been a pleasure to ride.

More recently though all the gears have been slipping. Sometimes I have changed down when going uphill only to have the gear lever slide its way back up again and changing gear had become somewhat imprecise. So hubby decided it was time to have a serious look at the problem. First he tightened up the gear lever. This was an improvement, it stopped it changing gear of its own accord, but made it rather stiff to operate.

Simplex Derailleur

New Simplex Derailleur

He had been mumbling for some time that the derailleur was not the best it could be and that perhaps he should change it, so finally last week he did just that. He tells me that the Simplex derailleur he has now fitted is not only in better condition than the old one that was on there when we acquired the bike (I think it was a Shimano – a good make but mine was rather worn!) but that it is also more in keeping with the age of the bike, or more age-specific as he termed it.

A  few days later we went out on a test ride. After a 16 mile ride I have to report that the problem seems to have been solved and HB’s gears seem to be fully operational, which is absolutely wonderful.

On this ride hubby rode his newly acquired hand-built Henry Burton bike, which he also declares to be a joy to ride. This he bought from Henry Burton’s shop in Stafford, now run by his son. The bike had been built by Henry for a local man in the 1960’s. The previous owner has now died and his family asked Henry’s son to find the bike a good home and along came my hubby!

This is not the only Henry Burton bike my hubby has recently acquired, he also has a slightly more recent model which was made by Falcon and branded as a Henry Burton (they stopped making their own bikes when Henry retired) which he obtained from our local bike re-cycling charity Back2Bikes and which he has just finished refurbishing. This, with our two Mixte (also branded Henry Burton but built elsewhere) brings our total of Henry Burton bikes to five. I think that is probably enough don’t you?

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