Back Again – Or Not!

Well I am back after a wonderful long weekend away with the tandem at the Tandem Club National Rally near Oxford. The weather was glorious for the time of year and I even caught the sun before remembering to slap on the sun scream cream. We managed about 124 miles over four rides around roads, lanes and tracks.

That’s the good news. The bad news is that I may not be around much over the next few weeks as I have rather a lot on. First my brother-in-law, who is moving back to the UK from Portugal is staying with us while sorting out the purchase of a retirement apartment a few miles from our home. Although an offer has been accepted on an apartment and this is proceeding it could take some time and it is always difficult to find time to do your own thing when you have a house guest!

Secondly, my poetry group has produced collections of poems by members from time-to-time over the years, often for special occasions. We have decided to produce one for the Queen’s Platinum Jubilee and I will be editing it as our previous editor is not at all well and is no longer a member of the group. I shall need to get on with the job over the next couple of weeks so that it can be with the printer in time for it to be produced for the Platinum Celebrations in early June – and I haven’t even written my own contribution yet! The deadline for contributions by our members is 30th April so I must try to comply with my own rules. Most of my available spare time will be spent on this project.

I will drop in when I find the time but this may be infrequently until at least the middle of May.

Strain

Editing done, now I can rest
repetitive strain round my thumb and wrist.
Too long computing, I’ll stop for today,
sit down and rest, let the pain fade away.

Done

The latest edition ‘put to bed’,
my spring magazine is done.
Time at last to do other things…
or maybe just relax in the sun!

* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *
I still have to address the envelopes ready to post them out while I wait for them to be printed. I do enjoy doing the magazine but it is always a relief when it is all done and dusted for another six months.

Sorry!

Sorry, no proper post today. Having been very busy publishing ‘Simply Elfje’ before taking a break to go sailing I am now spending all my time compiling the magazine that I edit twice a year for a sailing association we belong to. The Spring/Summer issue should be out around now, so I’m having to prioritize – I must get the magazine done. Then maybe I can concentrate on issuing the e-book version of ‘Simply Elfje’ – I promise you it will be worth the wait!

As The Saying Goes

I am now into my thirteenth year of editing the bi-annual magazine of a sailing association that we belong to. When compiling the magazine there are often little pockets of space, usually at the bottom of a page, where it doesn’t seem sensible to start a new article when it would look better beginning on the following page. This means that I have to find ‘fillers’ for these spaces.

From the first issue that I produced I began a series of ‘fillers’ which I called “As The Saying Goes”. For this series I take a well-known phrase that has its roots in the glory days of sail and explain how the saying came into being and what it means. I try to find those phrases that are less obviously nautical and that I think will be of interest to the members. Another advantage of this series is that some sayings need longer explanations than others so I can pick and choose appropriate ones to fill the space available.

Having just completed and sent out our Spring/Summer issue for this year I thought it might be of interest to post here the saying that appears in the current issue:

“By and Large”

The expression ‘by and large’ is used in common parlance today to mean on the whole, generally speaking, all things considered, but it is yet another expression of nautical origin. To understand this we need to understand what is meant by the nautical terms ‘by’ and ‘large’.

A ship is said to be sailing ‘large’ when the wind is blowing from a compass point somewhere behind the direction of travel, either directly behind or on the stern quarter. Conversely to sail ‘by’, or ‘by the wind’, means to be sailing as close-hauled as possible into the direction of the wind. To ‘sail by and large’ required the ship to sail not only downwind but also against the wind. The 19th Century windjammers like the Cutty Sark were able to maintain progress ‘by and large’ even in bad wind conditions by the use of aerodynamic triangular sails and large crews of able seamen.

So there you have it!

Deadline

Editing,
deadline looming,
searching for ideas,
articles to fill blank
pages.

(This Elfje also appears today on my other blog at ‘Simply Elfje’)

Site content copyright of Elizabeth Leaper (Libby).

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