Time To Go

The leaves are turning;
time to go and find some sun,
holiday abroad!

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I seem to have got in a bit of a muddle with my posts this week, I’m having trouble keeping track of what day it is. This is mainly because we are off tomorrow (Saturday) for an extended trip through France to Spain and back. I shall therefore be taking a break from blogging until late November. I hope to catch up with you all then. Sadly I shall miss the progress of Autumn, which is a season I love. No doubt all the trees will be nearly bare by the time I return and life will be a mad rush to get ready for Christmas.

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Long Overdue – Septolet

Having re-blogged an article on Saturday, not my usual blogging day, I decided to revert to small stones poetry today, especially as I am enjoying writing Septolets so much at the moment!

* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *
Cold
and wet
ice dripping,
mopping puddles.

A job
long overdue —
de-frosting the freezer!

Sycamore Tree – Septolet

Always first —
Sycamore tree
splashed russet
and golden.

South facing
sunburned leaves
welcome change.

Winding Down – Septolet

Summer fades.
Leaves slowly
turn golden.

The year
winds down,
steadily increasing
its pace.

* * * * * * * * * * * * * * *
A Septolet consists of 7 lines in 14 words, arranged in two parts with a break between, both parts dealing with the same thought.

This is my first attempt at a Septolet. My thanks to Elaine Patricia Morris (Watermelonseeds) for introducing me to this delightful form.

Small Changes

If you were told that one small change to your life-style/diet could improve your health and possible even save your life would you make that change?

I ask the question because, though I may be wrong, I suspect that many people, once they know what that change is, would say ‘let me think about it’ and then do nothing! Certainly you would want to know before you commit. If it was say, simply to stop eating lettuce then possibly, no problem.

It is undeniable that there has been an increase over the last 50+ years in the incidence of obesity, high blood-pressure, diabetes, arthritis, heart disease, stomach problems, cancer and many other complaints, yet it seems that one small change to diet might just, if not cure then at least relive many of these issues. So what is that change?

Wheat. Simply eliminate wheat from your diet. A book recently caught my eye in my local charity shop and attracted my interest so I bought it – I doubt I would have bought it at full price. The book is by William Davis, MD and is called ‘Wheat Belly’. I started reading it at once and found it considerably more interesting than I had expected. All his claims are backed up by references to scientific papers and research projects. Much of the information is now freely available but as yet it has not filtered through into the common consciousness.

The point that he makes is that although wheat has been the staple diet of western society for centuries, causing no problems, during the last 50+ years it has changed, due to hybridisation and GM into something that bears very little resemblance to the early types of wheat that mankind ate, and those changes are harmful to mankind. Coupled with this has been dietary advice to eat more whole grains (wheat) and it is during these recent years that the incidence of all the diseases of modern life have ballooned. People have got more obese, diabetes and all the other ailments are more prevalent and there is  also an increase in obesity in children on a scale never seen before.

Dr. Davis argues most convincingly for wheat being the culprit, and I reiterate, his assertions are backed up by science. I haven’t time to go into all the science here, for that you will have to read the book. However, giving up wheat is probably not quite as simple as it sounds. First to go are bread, cakes and biscuits, but far more of the foodstuffs found in our local supermarkets contain wheat – from tinned soups, gravy and sauce mixes, beverages, some yoghurts and much more besides, to chewing gum and lipstick – read the labels. (Modified food starch on the label? That’s wheat!)

Now I’m not obese, probably you wouldn’t even describe me as fat but I can pinch more than an inch of spare flesh around my middle – not healthy! Also I have been troubled with what would probably, if I went to the doctor, be diagnosed as ‘IBS’ for as long as I can remember, certainly since childhood. I haven’t let it interfere with my life, I just ignore it and suffer in silence. Apart from that I am physically fit and healthy, I do not suffer from high-blood pressure, as far as I am aware I do not have diabetes or any heart problems nor do I have arthritis, although as I am getting older I do have more aches and pains which no doubt will develop into arthritis if I am not careful. I am not on any prescribed medication.

However, I have been sufficiently impressed by what I have read to give it a go. It’s not a topic that normally fills me with enthusiasm (I eat to live not live to eat!) but I’m going to have to get rather more interested in food as I learn to cook and eat without wheat. The advice is to make a clean break and chuck out all the wheat-containing products is your kitchen. I can’t bring myself to waste stuff like that so I will phase it out gradually. Meanwhile I have been researching recipes for meals without wheat and there is plenty out there, including alternatives to cake and bread (note: ‘Gluten-Free’ from your supermarket is not advised as it contains all sorts of other undesirables, but can be used now and again. Also note ‘wheat-free’ and ‘gluten-free’ are not the same thing, although of course there are overlaps).

If you are interested I suggest you read the book and/or others on the same topic that are also available. There is also plenty of information on the internet. Take a look at http://www.wheat-free.org and www.elanaspantry.com for starters, both contain some delicious-looking recipes I am going to experiment with over the coming weeks, including wheat-free alternatives to popular favourites.  I will keep you informed of progress and will be more than pleased if I lose that spare flesh and improve my temperamental tummy.

Incidentally, I met a friend a couple of days ago whose weight has ballooned in recent months for no apparent reason (he has some other health issues too). His doctor had no advice to help and has since retired. What has his new younger doctor advised? – cut out wheat!

 

Romany Caravan

Trundling down the road comes
a barrel-shaped Romany Caravan,
drawn by a horse with its gentle clip-clopping,
holding up the traffic
but no-one really minding
as cars slowly pass, occupants smiling.

Perch

First post in place
for the new garden fence.
It doesn’t take the pigeons long
to find a new perch!

‘Bertie’ Bike

Typical isn’t it? Very shortly after I had published last Monday’s post (which you can read here) my husband finished the refurbishing of my ‘new’ classic road-racing bike, an original locally built ‘Henry Burton’. So here, to remind you, are the before and after pictures:

Henry Burton Bike

Before

 

Henry Burton Bike refurbished

After

As you can see the bike has had a re-spray. Various parts have also been replaced with era compatible components. (You can view the state of the bike when it arrived on my previous post here.) There have been a few teething problems with brakes and gears and some tweaking has taken place. I have taken it on a few very short test rides plus a first trial of about 9 miles and then yesterday a 35 mile ride. Unfortunately the gears are still not completely playing the game – there are only 5 (due to its age) but for some reason it absolutely refuses to go into 5th so at the moment effectively only has 4 gears! I’m pleased to say despite being the only lady amongst 10 men on the ride yesterday and despite my four gears to their (mostly) 16 options on their modern bikes I was able to keep up pretty well. The bike fits me well, has a nice light feel to it and is a joy to ride.

Hubby has had it up on the bike stand several times to try to solve the gear shift problem and all the gears appear to function smoothly but as soon as I get it out on the road 5th gear will just not shift. For the moment it has us puzzled but I expect it will get sorted eventually. Any bike mechanics out there with suggestions?

In case you are wondering, the red bow on the front is there because the bike is my birthday present and I was told to leave the bow in place until the day – it’s today (but I have still left it there)! I have also, you will have noticed, continued to call the bike ‘Bertie’ as the name seems to have stuck now.

Also of interest and something that I have not mentioned before, you may like to know that Henry Burton was a one-time racing cyclist (as was his son John). When he stopped racing Henry learned frame building from Ernie Clements, another ex-racing cyclist turned frame builder whom Henry worked for before setting up on his own. Our eldest son owns a lovely classic Ernie Clements bike which he has also refurbished – a very nice bike.

 

 

 

Strange Things

What strange things some people do.
Yesterday a lady I do not know
was plucking handfuls of grass
from the roadside verge
and stuffing it into a plastic bag.

Politeness got the better of curiosity —
I did not stop to ask but walked on by
as if it was nothing out of the ordinary
while pondering what explanation
might have emerged.

Breeze

After a grey start
Summer shows her face, blown in
on a cool, fresh breeze.

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